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When Irish Eyes are Smiling: 4 Tips for Senior Eye Health

Anyone who loves a senior understands the importance of being informed on senior issues, and so do we. Our Milestone Magazine posts are meant to help seniors and their families as they learn and transition together through the physical and emotional changes brought on by aging.


As we age and change, so do our eyes.  After age 60, it’s important to follow these tips to keep eyes in tip-top shape.


1)    Eyes are what you eat
Eye-healthy diets are rich in antioxidants, vitamins A and C, and omega 3s, making green vegetables and fish great choices. (So, although the old wives tale that carrots are good for your eyes does hold some truth, the best diets come from a variety of lean proteins and veggies).  Inversely, diets that are high in saturated fats can lead to restricted blood flow to eyes (and a bunch of other important systems too!) so limiting fat, carbs, and sugar is always a good idea.


2)    Kick smoking to the curb
By now, we all know that smoking is a far from healthy habit, but its effect on aging eyes is particularly alarming.  The risk of developing cataracts doubles, on average, for smokers. For men smoking more than a pack a day, the risk jumps to 205% higher, and for women, it hovers around 63%.


3)    Make sunglasses a part of your look
Always wear sunglasses when you’re outside during the day, and, make sure your sunglasses are strong enough to shield you 100% of UV rays.  Wearing sunglasses helps reduce your risk of cataracts, pinguecula, and a handful of other eye problems.  So, although spending time outdoors has been linked to a list of senior health benefits, UV rays should be handled with caution.  


4)    Let there be light!
Did you know that your eyes need three times as much light when you're 60 as they did when you were 20? Keep the light levels in your home up to par by keeping your windows clean and curtains pulled back, and making sure you have enough light fixtures in your home, especially in places where they might impact safety (i.e., at the top and bottom of stairs).


For more information on how to stay physically and emotionally engaged after retirement, visit Milestone Magazine.